31 Knights of Halloween: "13 Ghosts" (part 3)

Viewing the film Thir13en Ghosts through a psychiatrist's lens, part three

Posted October 28, 2018


Synopsis

Thirteen Ghosts entries> Thirteen Ghosts (Thir13en Ghosts) is a remake of the 1960 horror film, 13 Ghosts, written by Robb White. When the original film premiered, scenes involving ghosts were shown in Illusion-O: audiences received viewers with red and blue cellophane filters, giving them a choice to see the ghosts (look through the red filter) or not (blue filter “removed” the ghosts).


When his eccentric uncle dies, Arthur Kriticos moves his family into a bequeathed mansion haunted by malevolent ghosts. There is literally danger around every corner, as the spells that keep the ghosts at bay are broken, unleashing the 12 tortured souls onto their new landlord and his family.

You are watching: The jackal 13 ghosts ryan kuhn

How it relates to the field of psychiatry


The film allows for the discussion of Antisocial Personality Disorder from 12 converging perspectives, each explained by the biographies of the 12 ghosts of the black zodiac. Today, we’ll analyze the final 3 ghosts.

10. The Hammer

Biography: The Hammer is the ghost of George Markley, a blacksmith who was wrongfully accused of stealing. A gang led by his accuser hanged his wife and children and burned their bodies. George killed his accuser with his sledgehammer. He was then subjected to a cruel form of “frontier justice,” being chained to a tree and executed by having railroad spikes driven into his body. The mob then cut off his hand and attached the sledgehammer to the wrist. His ghost is seen with the railroad spikes protruding from his body and a sledgehammer for a left hand.


Links to psychiatry: Candyman (1992)

Both “The Hammer” and Candyman myths are about African Americans wrongfully accused, persecuted by a mob, killed, with their hands cut off and replaced by weapons. Hence, both are cultural warnings about revenge (taken by those wrongfully accused), and as urban legends, help a culture lend explanation to random events of violence.


11. The Jackal

Biography: The Jackal is the ghost of Ryan Kuhn. Born to a prostitute in 1887, Ryan began attacking prostitutes by his early adult years. He was committed to Borinwood Asylum where he perished in a suspicious fire. His ghost is in his undone strait-jacket with his head locked in a broken cage.


Links to psychiatry: Charles Manson

Ryan Kuhn is The Jackal, the Manson spirit, aptly named given his shared developmental history with Charles Manson. Hence, the 11th ghost represents severe Antisocial Personality Disorder and sociopathy.

12. The Juggernaut

Biography: The Juggernaut is the ghost of a serial killer named Horace “Breaker” Mahoney. Standing seven feet tall, Mahoney “went mad” following the death of his parents, picking up female hitchhikers and tearing them apart with his bare hands. One day, he picked up an undercover female police officer, who called for backup, bringing in a SWAT team that took Horace down in a hail of bullets. His ghost shows bullet holes all over his clothing, and the round that finished him, in the center of his forehead.


Links to psychiatry: Edmund Kemper

As imposing serial killers go, Breaker Mahoney is the spirit of the “Co-ed Butcher,” Ed Kemper. Standing 6 ft 9 in and weighing about 280 pounds, Kemper killed 10 people, 1 less than his fictional counterpart. Much like our 11th ghost, Mahoney depicts severe Antisocial Personality Disorder and sociopathy.


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Anthony Tobia, M.D.

See more: Shmoop Romeo And Juliet Act 3, Romeo And Juliet Act 5, Scene 3

, currently holds titles of Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.


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